Book Review

Book Review: “My Plain Jane”

“My Plain Jane” by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, & Jodi Meadows

Source: Purchased LitJoy Crate & Owlcrate

Genre: Young Adult Fiction, Historical Fiction

Summary:

You may think you know the story. After a miserable childhood, penniless orphan Jane Eyre embarks on a new life as a governess at Thornfield Hall. There, she meets one dark, brooding Mr. Rochester. Despite their significant age gap (!) and his uneven temper (!!), they fall in love—and, Reader, she marries him. (!!!)

Or does she?

Prepare for an adventure of Gothic proportions, in which all is not as it seems, a certain gentleman is hiding more than skeletons in his closets, and one orphan Jane Eyre, aspiring author Charlotte Brontë, and supernatural investigator Alexander Blackwood are about to be drawn together on the most epic ghost hunt this side of Wuthering Heights. 

This. Was. So. Much. Fun.

Just a few things to note: You don’t need to read My Lady Jane before reading this. You also don’t need to read Jane Eyre before reading this book. I do highly recommend both books but I don’t think they’re totally necessary for your enjoyment. They will simply enhance the story for you..

I actually love the fact that it wasn’t just a Jane Eyre retelling with additional materials added to it. It definitely uses Jane Eyre as a basis for the story but the authors run wild with it in the best possible way. Charlotte Bronte and family even make an appearance in the story which was cool.

Much like My Lady Jane, the ladies shed light on what the ~real~ story is. In our case, Jane Eyre isn’t simply the story of a governess falling for the master of the house. It’s the story of the Society doing everything to recruit Jane into their services. As you know dear reader, that isn’t the entire story. No more from me! You’ll need to read the story.

I know the humor isn’t everyone’s cup of tea. It was 100% my jam though. Ridiculous adventures, silliness,. Examples of humor:

“My name is Alexander Blackwood. You killed my father. Prepare to–“

“He keeps it locked in a room guarded by a three-headed dog, which drops into a pit of strangling vines, followed by a life-or-death life-size game of chess, which opens into a room with a locked door, and a hundred keys on wings..”

If fun easter eggs and frequent comments to the reader aren’t your thing, you might pass on the book. If those are your thing, READ THIS BOOK NOW.

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